Importing Crime: The Numbers Are Scary and So are the Costs



Is there a strong correlation between mass immigration and crime?

The data strongly suggests the answer to that question is yes.  In fact, roughly 44 percent of all primary federal convictions are against non-citizens, according to new data released from the U.S. Sentencing Commission’s Interactive Sourcebook.  The data, which covers the years 2011 to 2016, reveal that both legal and illegal non-citizens accounted for 201,330 convictions during that period.  That’s an astonishing:

  • 31 percent of drug convictions;
  • 18 percent of economic crimes (fraud, embezzlement, forgery, tax);
  • 42 percent of kidnapping/hostage taking;
  • 22 percent of money laundering and
  • 42 percent of arson-related criminal convictions.

Moreover, since non-citizens are estimated to comprise just seven percent of the total U.S. population – according the Kaiser Family Foundation – they account for a disproportionally high number of the nation’s primary federal convictions.  It’s also important to note that these numbers do not take into account state and local convictions.

To add insult to injury, the cost of incarcerating these imported criminals is not small change.  The Federal Register estimates that is costs nearly $32,000 per person, per year, to incarcerate a federal prisoner.

About Author

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Dave rejoined the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) in 2016 and brings more than thirty years of proactive communications experience working with non-profits, trade associations and the private sector. Dave has written and placed op-eds in more than 100 publications for national and state leaders in fields ranging from immigration to agriculture policy, food and energy. Ray has served as a chief spokesman for several national organizations and has extensive radio and television experience as well.

FAIR blogs can now be found on our main site at https://www.fairus.org/blog